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deborahknowles
Senior Member
posted 02-25-2005 02:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for deborahknowles   Click Here to Email deborahknowles     Edit/Delete Message
Who would have mended a broken limb in the 1300s? Was it a surgeon or some other person? And how would they have done it? (I'm particularly interested in arms, here)I'm presuming the bone did not break the skin otherwise you would probably have died from the infection. cheers

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Peter
Member
posted 02-26-2005 06:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Peter   Click Here to Email Peter     Edit/Delete Message
Without looking, I would have thought it might have been the local Priest or Monk from the church, nearby abbey.
As you say a simple break, a green fracture would no doubt have been dealt with easily. There are several herbs that helped in this progress of healing, and are called 'bone-setters'.
Now, if I was organised I could reach out and pick up the booklet the lists all the usages. But I aint.
One very common one is 'Comfrey', which I grow in my garden. This was used as a pultice. Wrapped around a break or bad bruising, it would reduce swelling and help with the healing process.
I recall my own Grandmother using it many years ago.
I use it for the garden.
For if it is cut and placed in vessel with a tap (or some method of drainage), the resulting blackish liquor is used for feeding plants. Let down of course.
Not forgetting the local 'wisewoman'. Of which each village had one. In later years it was these women that were blamed for many things and burnt as witches.
Peter

Dorothy Davies
Senior Member
posted 02-27-2005 07:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dorothy Davies     Edit/Delete Message
I keep reading references to Barber-surgeons, but ... I am at work right now, tomorrow I will be able to let you have a link to a website that deals with medical queries. I subscribe to (free) the Medieval History newsletter which once a week brings me sheets of websites on many different topics. I'll add that info as well, it may help. Write a note, Dorothy ... you know what your memory's like ... right, note done, stand by!

Dorothy Davies
Senior Member
posted 02-27-2005 07:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dorothy Davies     Edit/Delete Message
oh, overlooked something, comfrey is known as Knitbone in old books.

Dorothy Davies
Senior Member
posted 02-27-2005 10:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dorothy Davies     Edit/Delete Message
further to earlier replies by me, http://glclk.about.com/?zi=9/THH
medieval science, technology, mathematics and medicine.

the about.com should lead you to the link to sign up for all sorts of different free newsletters. or http:/historymedren.about.com
the editor is Melissa Snell.

deborahknowles
Senior Member
posted 02-27-2005 11:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for deborahknowles   Click Here to Email deborahknowles     Edit/Delete Message
thanks guys esp Dorothy. I have that medieval newsletter already. There's loads of gruesome childborth stuff at the mo! I ended up looking up medieval clothes and coins and bidding for them on Ebay!!There's a woman who makes the most fab costumes in the world! Hope I'm lucky.

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Peter
Member
posted 02-27-2005 01:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Peter   Click Here to Email Peter     Edit/Delete Message
Oh no!
Not old E-Bay.
Can be costly.
Peter

Dorothy Davies
Senior Member
posted 02-28-2005 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dorothy Davies     Edit/Delete Message
no, Peter, ebay is not expensive at all if you choose carefully. I have acquired wonderful books at giveaway prices. I also acquired a coin from Edward IV's reign for 50 and one from Richard III's at a price way below what it could have gone to, he said, but because I am working with Richard III on his book, he said he would stop the auction, which he did, and let me have the coin at a very good price! I'm spending a fortune but getting wonderful books, really good condition excellent value books, signed copies in some instances, for under 10 including postage and buying brand new shoes at a third of the price of the local shop selling the same brand!

It's checking everything first to make sure your seller has good feedback, and then to ensure that there is not a cheaper version further down the listing. apart from that, go for it!

Dorothy Davies
Senior Member
posted 03-01-2005 05:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dorothy Davies     Edit/Delete Message
thanks to a thoughtful friend, I was able to see the Jousting programme last night - brilliant, wasn't it? very well done and congratulations to the men who volunteered to risk all (and one nearly did!) to ride the tournament. I thought it was very interesting indeed.

Peter
Member
posted 03-01-2005 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Peter   Click Here to Email Peter     Edit/Delete Message
I know Dorothy,
even bought my wifes Xmas present from E-Bay last year.
I tend too have a look every month or so, then I think you get a turnover of material.
Your postage can cost you a lot more than what you have paid sometimes though. Depends on what you are buying.
Peter

Dorothy Davies
Senior Member
posted 03-02-2005 04:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dorothy Davies     Edit/Delete Message
I hve just bought a job lot of books on Richard III, I have more than half of them already but - the entire lot is 20, plus 12.50 postage. That means, the books I don't have will haved cost me 32.50 and there is the chance of posting the books I do have back on ebay or Amazon and recouping the money. As I am anxious to build a huge Richard III library (essential) this is a good way to do it, I thought. I do check postage, carefully! a shop in Norfolk has closed and is selling off brand new 70 shoes for 20 plus 5 postage, can't be bad!

I have bought, more specifically to this site, a King Charles half groat, an Edward IV groat and a Richard III royal, that last one being a great ebay story on its own! they are wonderful, it is one thing to write about those times, another to own something that was made in those times.

Peter
Member
posted 03-02-2005 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Peter   Click Here to Email Peter     Edit/Delete Message
The items I bought for Anita (10 in fact), were mainly from the Stuart/Tudor period. They were acredited detector finds from the area around Colchester.
They consisted of belt buckles, sword hanger, book clasp, Charles I coin, and several 'Jetons', which were a type of token used in Europe.
All these, and mounted on card for 40! Plus a little postage. Cost me as much again to have them nicely framed.
They look nice in the cottage lounge.
And the Boss was pleased.
Peter

All times are PT (US)

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